CAIR: “Schools Must Address 9/11 Without Anti-Muslim Bigotry”

Just 19 years after the 9/11 terror attacks, muslims are demanding we change the way lessons regarding 9/11 are taught in school.

On the 19th anniversary of the 9/11 terror attacks, CAIR (Council On American Islamic Relations), the nation’s largest muslim civil rights and advocacy organization, released a statement demanding that schools teach about 9/11 “without anti-muslim bigotry”.

CAIR complains that some lessons “blame the attack on Islam itself or Muslims at-large instead of Al-Qaeda.” CAIR claims that some “teachers openly use the 9/11 anniversary as an opportunity to stoke anti-Muslim bigotry in the classroom.” CAIR also complains about the term “Radical Islamic Terrorism” being used.

Imagine a Muslim fifth grader who watches silently as his teacher plays video footage of an airplane slamming into the World Trade Center, attributes the attack to “Radical Islamic Terrorism,” and claims that Muslims around the world celebrated 9/11 or failed to condemn it.

CAIR went as far as to form a list of ways they’d like to see 9/11 taught, including not blaming muslims for the attacks, inviting muslims to speak at 9/11 memorial events, teachers going over lesson plans with the parents of muslims students beforehand, and of course, add in the teachings of “islamophobia” and how muslims were treated after 9/11.

Yes, you heard that right. Muslims want “islamophobia” taught during 9/11 lessons.

Finally, addressing anti-Muslim bigotry and Islamophobia as a consequence of 9/11 should be a key component of teaching about that pivotal moment in our country’s history.

Just as we discuss internment of Japanese American citizens in the context of Pearl Harbor and World War II, we must also discuss the sharp rise in hate crimes against Muslims and people perceived to be Muslim, as well as how 9/11 sparked radical changes in national security policy and American foreign policy, often to the detriment of Muslims here and abroad.

Read CAIR’s full press release here